The Crucible of Freeman

Subtitle


This blog is a mix of body mod stuff, political outrage, general (often macabre) art, and occasionally other things that catch my interest. I try to provide sources for most things; feel free to message me if I make a mistake in that regard. I can be found on skype; feel free to ask me for my skype username.
I try to tag trigger warnings. If I've missed one that impacts you, let me know, and I'll make the effort to learn it. Genderqueer. Neutral pronouns for now, or I will slap your shit.

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inevitablyvause:

Thinking of starting Orphan Black. What do you think, should I go for it?

I cannot shout YES loud enough.

posted 4 hours ago with 4 notes
via:inevitablyvause source:inevitablyvause
#Orphan Black

the-undiscovered-country:

okay but whYYY IS IT CALLED ORPHAN BLACK

It’s a reference to Sarah’s past. Siobhan says to Carlton in the episode “Governed as it Were by Chance” (S2E04) "Twenty years ago, you brought an orphan to my door. ‘Put her in the black,’ you said, ‘as black as it gets.’" That’s what it refers to.

can we talk about the phrase “earn a living” and how deeply fucked up the idea we’re expected to justify our existence through work and wages is though?

(Source: queerandpresentdanger)

thecreepylittlegirl:

You can’t pick and choose what parts of feminism you want. You can’t support your queer sisters but not your trans sisters. You can’t support your fat sisters but not your sisters of colour. Being a feminist means creating a positive and equal space for women. The second you start excluding women based on which characteristics you do or do not find appealing you have defeated the whole point of being a feminist.

controlyourface:

nextworldover:

panty-christ:

panty-christ:

not-a-reindeer:

I forgot what this was from for a moment and thought it was a gif set of Jonathan Crane weeping while he tried to microwave a pinwheel.

FOR 528,491 MINUTES

i’m still thinking about it that’s too long jonathan that’s too long to microwave a pinwheel 

you know i was thinking about this and i realized microwaves usually input by seconds, not by minutes. so he’s actually only microwaving the pinwheel for 8808 minutes and 11 seconds.

which is obviously a way more reasonable amount of time to microwave a pinwheel for come back in six days two hours forty-eight minutes and eleven seconds *ding* your pinwheel is done

(Source: dragqueeneames)

bi-privilege:

borg-collective:

bi-privilege:

some informational venn diagrams on bisexuality

I am pretty sure that being perceived as straight while in a relationship with a woman, explicitly being exempt from being called diseased by family members and not having to fear negative consequences like getting fired from talking about my relationship, counts as some kind of privilege?

Hint: it’s straight privilege.

fun facts for you, studies have actually found that bisexuals have similar or higher levels of STI infections compared to gay and lesbian monosexuals, probably because of the lack of bisexual-friendly health care; one of the first times bisexuals ever got any public attention was during the midst of the aids crisis when straight people were blaming us for spreading aids to them; and bisexual men are not allowed to donate blood in the U.S. and a bunch of other countries either and any of their female sexual partners have to wait six months after their last sexual encounter to donate. bisexuals getting called diseased? check.

more fun facts! the pew research survey of lgbt americans found that a high percentage of gay and lesbian monosexuals reported that their work places were very accepting of their identity than bisexuals—60% of gay men and half of lesbian women, compared to 44% of bisexuals. this probably contributes to the fact that, while only 8% of gay men and 6% of lesbians say that they are not out at their place of work, over half of bisexuals report being closeted at work.

as for being perceived at straight-weirdly enough, that’s not a phenomenon exclusive to bisexuality! it’s almost as if we live in a heteronormative society in which anyone not doing something explicitly not straight at this very moment is automatically assumed to be straight (excluding people with non-conforming gender expressions, who are automatically assumed to be not straight)—oh wait, we do! and yet no one ever says that gay and lesbian monosexuals who are not in a relationship, or who are stopping by the grocery store to pick up some cereal without their significant other, have straight privilege! i wonder why?

oh right. biphobia. that’s why.

Also that aint straight privilege by any definition, it’s just erasure.

posted 15 hours ago with 19,279 notes
via:meridok source:bi-privilege
#biphobia
Anonymous inquired:

How tall are you?

I couldn’t put a precise measurement on it, but somewhere around 5’10” I think?

posted 1 day ago with 1 note

grumpypedant:

I think a lot of people have trouble understanding transgender issues because they try to see themselves as trans, but come at it from the wrong direction. i.e. a cis woman tries to understand transness by going, “what if I felt like/wanted to be a man” when she should be approaching it as “what if I, a woman, was so easily mistaken for a man that I had to pretend to be one”,

And I think this is something to keep in mind and to explain away when trying to get these matters across to people who’re new to the idea.

posted 3 days ago with 8,820 notes
via:meridok source:grumpypedant

Clone club!

cloneinstitute:

grantword:

Spoiler TV is having a Favourite TV Competition thing and Orphan Black is currently losing to Once Upon A Time, so vote for OB here:

http://www.spoilertv.com/2014/09/the-spoilertv-favourite-tv-series_27.html

image

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)